Freeing One’s Mind from the Past

In most cases, the culprit for not allowing mankind to open their mind to possibilities is the past. More specifically it is the way that things are currently done which is the ultimate hindrance. 

Whilst one might actually embrace new technology, one often employs that technology in the same manner in which the older technology was utilised. By implication, utilising new technology also means embracing not only the new way of doing things and but also casting aside how things were done before or unlearning the past. 

That is why youngsters are so adept with new gadgets. They are not constrained by the past and how things “should be done.” 

Main picture: Creative positioning mirror

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Zimbabwe: Destruction of its Timber Plantations

This is a timely reminder of one of the consequences of the ill-considered land invasion policy of the ZANU-PF in Zimbabwe. It was recently revealed by the Finance Minister of Zimbabwe. 

Will the likes of Julius Malema and the EFF take cognaissance of this open admission of this policy’s devastating consequences? 

 Main picture: Timber plantations in the Eastern Highlands of Zimbabwe  Continue reading

The Future is E-Government

Maybe governments employ computers to process and record transactions and store data but by a large measure, the mindset is still 19th century. At best, their current practices are still in the mid 20th century mode. What will it take to bring it in line with Best Practice?

 Pictures: All of them are photographs of Port Elizabeth 100 years ago. The main picture was taken outside the Edward Hotel in Belmont Terrace

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Lost Artefacts of Port Elizabeth: Octagon Café & the Bathing Pavillion

Many of the buildings constructed nowadays have little to recommend them. Being merely rectangular blocks, they do not enhance life through their aesthetic appeal. Maybe this is acceptable for industrial buildings but for structures along a beachfront, the bar needs to be set higher. Two buildings of yore met that criterion: the Octagon Café and the Bathing Pavillion. Sadly both are no more.

 Main picture: The Octagon Cafe on the Elizabeth Promenade

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No more walks in the Wood

With the world’s population growing at 200,000 per diem, the world’s children of the 2050s face the very real risk of never being afforded the opportunity of walking through a wood or even playing sport on a grassy field. In Gauteng, the towns of Pretoria, Joburg and Van der Bijl Park have already almost converged into one megacity within the past 30 years. 

Contrast this with early man. Was the impact of these peoples such as the Aborigines of Australia or the Maoris of New Zealand as benign as is supposed? Or is modern man with its industrial scale re-engineering of the topography, the proverbial poster boy of environmental destruction or despoilation? 

Main picture: An aboriginal woman performs the Woggan-ma-gule morning ceremony on Australia Day in Sydney, Friday, Jan. 26, 2007. Australia Day marks the arrival of the first European settlers in 1788. (AP Photo/Paul Miller)

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